welcome

Master of Education
ONLINE

Our Master of Education online degree program is designed for women and men in the teaching profession, applicable to both elementary and secondary teachers in all areas of certification and structured to help good teachers become great teachers – all online!

We hope you enjoy your online learning experience.

If you have any questions about the program, please contact Dr. Eric C. Michael, Master of Education Program Director Online Program at 717.264.4141, ext. 3109 or by email at eric.michael@wilson.edu

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Available courses

  • This course is a comprehensive approach to support student achievement across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. SAS involves the understanding and integrated use of six areas including: PA and Common Core standards, fair assessment, curriculum framework, aligned instruction, materials and resources, and interventions. Course goals and content include: understanding the national movement for core academic standards, understanding Pennsylvania’s Standards Aligned System (SAS), understanding the research base underlying the 6 components (delineated above), use of diagnostics and formative assessment, use of PA’s Ed Portal as an ongoing job-embedded resource for educators, and Development and conduction of a professional development activity or awareness session in the educator’s own school district on PA’s SAS and curriculum frameworks.

  • This course introduces students to sociology as a social science.  Major topics include the nature of group structure and interaction, social control and deviance, culture, social change, social stratification and the structure and function of social institutions.

  • This course examines the major issues and debates regarding women and American politics. We will first examine the origin and development of women’s rights movements in the United States. We will move from the fight for women’s suffrage through second wave feminism and the backlash against it—and take a close look at the fight for the ERA. The second section explores women’s behavior as actors within the political system—as voters, candidates, and officeholders. In the final unit, we will examine laws and public policies related to women and employment and examine the recent litigation over gender discrimination at Wal-Mart.

  • This course is a comprehensive approach to support student achievement across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. SAS involves the understanding and integrated use of six areas including: PA and Common Core standards, fair assessment, curriculum framework, aligned instruction, materials and resources, and interventions. Course goals and content include: understanding the national movement for core academic standards, understanding Pennsylvania’s Standards Aligned System (SAS), understanding the research base underlying the 6 components (delineated above), use of diagnostics and formative assessment, use of PA’s Ed Portal as an ongoing job-embedded resource for educators, and Development and conduction of a professional development activity or awareness session in the educator’s own school district on PA’s SAS and curriculum frameworks.

  • This course examines philosophical conceptions of curriculum, educational assessment, and principles of planning instruction. Students will construct assessment tools for the evaluation of student progress, teaching effectiveness, and curriculum alignment. Additionally, students will investigate state testing, interpretation, and the meaningful use of results.

  • This course is a survey of traditional and contemporary concepts associated with computer technology. A two-pronged approach involves understanding the functioning of personal computers and how computer technology is applied in western society as well as the practical use of application software. This application software includes word processing, spreadsheet and database management tools.

  • Beginning with the Classical Daoist texts of the 3rd century BCE (often referred to as “philosophical Daoism”), we will discuss the mythical/mystical figure of Laozi  and the seminal and enigmatic text attributed to him (the Daodejing), the philosopher Zhuangzi, and other Daoist sages.  We will then examine the origins, beliefs, and practices of the Daoist religion, with its hereditary and monastic priesthoods, complex body of rituals, religious communities, and elaborate and esoteric regimens of meditation and alchemy

  • This course will explore current and relevant educational issues that possess interconnections with politics, history, ideology, curriculum, and social practice. The primary focus of the course will be on examining the major opposing viewpoints on the issues in American schools of today. Through the integration of knowledge, the course prepares educators to critically examine various schools of philosophical thought and political issues related to education. Analyzing existing programs to improve school effectiveness, and review research-based best practices for effective educational outcomes will be addressed. While none of the topics will be covered in great depth, it is hoped that educators will be inspired to explore in depth topics of personal interest.

  • In this course students will study the fundamentals of economic analysis by applying economic principles to macroeconomic problems, including inflation, employment, growth, business cycles, and governmental budgets. Emphasis will be placed on evaluating real world events using methods of economic analysis, with focus on theories, equations, and graphs as diagnostic tools, and on the role of fiscal policy and monetary policy in macroeconomic stabilization. Students successfully completing this course will have an understanding of basic economic principles focused on the market system, and will be able to think about world events from an economic perspective.

  • A direct contemporary of and profound influence on Shakespeare, Marlowe’s plays have long been considered second only to Shakespeare’s in the Renaissance pantheon. However, the universal nature of Marlowe’s works allows a contemporary audience for further avenues of exploration. Marlowe’s themes—especially as they relate to alienation, o/Otherness, difference, enfranchisement and disenfranchisement—resonate still in our culture today. In this class, we will read Marlowe’s five major works—Dr. Faustus, Edward II, The Jew of Malta, Tamburlaine Parts I+II—through the lens of the o/Other, focusing our discussions (to an extent) on how Marlowe presents, deconstructs, and utilizes the themes of difference in his works.

     

  • This course provides in-service teachers with an understanding of the essentials of reading processes necessary for all students to become proficient readers. The course will teach the most promising elements of effective literacy programs based in research and/or professional opinion. Application of the elements to content area texts will help students derive greater comprehension of content area material.

  • Students will read authors whose works have strongly influenced modernity: e.g., Wordsworth, Coleridge, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Kafka, Woolf, and Freud. Discussion topics include the romanticism-realism debate, the critique of patriarchy, and the emergence of the unconscious.

  • EDU 598 examines exemplary literature and research projects that represent examples of the systematic collection, evaluation, presentation, and interpretation of research data in education. Various research designs and methodologies are explored, emphasizing actions research done in educational contexts. Student research projects will reflect a specific education research style, such as experimental, correlational, survey, grounded theory, ethnography, narrative or mixed methods. Students will be guided in the selection of an appropriate master’s project topic and a review and critique of relevant literature. The students will develop a comprehensive design proposal for a major research project.
    EDU 598 is the first course of the master’s project. The final stage in the master’s project is EDU 599. Upon completion, the student will formally present her/his research project to the college.

  • This project-oriented, hands-on course will enable candidates to develop strategies for the effective integration of computer and multimedia technologies in their classrooms. Basic understanding and practical uses of major software applications and emerging computer and multimedia technologies will be emphasized. Use & modeling of Web 2.0 tools will be apparent. Candidates will develop various projects that utilize computer and multimedia technologies for curriculum enhancement, communication, record keeping, and assessment. Additionally, candidates will focus on the societal implications and ethical challenges facing educators in 21st Century classrooms.

  • The course will examine best practices in instructional and curricular practices and strategies and the characteristics evidenced in effective teaching studies. The course aims to help M.Ed. students to construct a useful bridge between theory and practice. Members of the course will apply their understanding of best practices of curriculum and instruction by completing assignments and projects that connect to their respective classrooms and areas of certification. Members will also apply their understanding of best practices and effective teaching throughout this course.

  • Students will examine the educational strategies and practices helpful in meeting the needs of students with special needs that are educated in the regular education classroom. The course will help teachers read and understand IEPs, Section 504 Plans/ PA Chapter 15 Plans, as well as PA Chapter 16 requirements and implement them in the inclusive settings. Co-teaching strategies with special education teachers in regular education classroom will be covered. The source will help teachers build relationships with and among students, teach social skills, and provide positive behavior supports.

  • This course will be a topical survey of Eastern philosophy. The philosophical topics we shall directly address include: ethics, death, reality, self, and knowledge.

    I want you to do well in this class; I’ll help you as much as I can. However, your success depends on your own hard work and your willingness to reach out when you need help. Some of the readings are very difficult, requiring extreme patience and attention. I don’t expect most of you will manage to dig through all the rich resources in the Sourcebook but I do expect you to make the attempt.

    In this class we will examine the philosophical traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism.  While we may think of these as “religions,” rather than philosophy, practitioners do not always separate them. However, for the purposes of this class, we’ll be examining the theoretical and ethical underpinnings of each of these major traditions, rather than looking at worship practices.

    Perhaps the most important characteristic of eastern philosophy is the awareness of the unity and mutual interrelation of all things and events, the experience of all phenomena in the universe as manifestations of a basic oneness.

  • It is often stated that the future of the American economy rests in the success of our entrepreneurs and small business owners. It is through our free market system that individuals are free to pursue their dreams of economic and personal fulfillment while providing greater value to the community. This course examines the entrepreneurial aspect of starting a new venture, capitalizing on an idea, developing a business plan, and financing and growing the business. Topics include business plans, finance, legal aspects, government regulation, marketing, and human resource considerations.

  • This course is a survey of traditional and contemporary concepts associated with computer technology. A two-pronged approach involves understanding the functioning of personal computers and how computer technology is applied in western society as well as the practical use of application software. This application software includes word processing, spreadsheet and database management tools.

  • This course prepares students to deal with the conceptual, theoretical, political, and philosophical issues in multicultural education. It has been designed to clarify issues related to pluralistic education, adopt a philosophical position, design and implement effective teaching strategies that reflect ethnic and cultural diversity, and prepare sound guidelines for multicultural programs and practices. In this course, diversity refers to all ways in which people differ, including that of socio-economic status, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religious practices, and other differences.

  • This course will explore the principles and components of differentiated instruction through the study of current and promising practices, as well as relevant research to meet the needs of all learners. It will assist educators with identifying the diverse educational needs, strengths, learning styles and preferences of all learners as well as applying differentiation of instruction to meet those needs.

  • EDU 599 is the capstone course for the Wilson M. Ed. program. Completion of a master’s thesis is the end product. The thesis project involves action research done in the student’s classroom or educational setting. The thesis will be completed in a chapter format. Chapter 1 will introduce the research project by describing the need for the study, a statement of the problem, and by identifying the research question. Chapter 2 will review the literature in the area specific to the research question. Chapter 3 will describe the methods used to conduct the action research. Chapter 4 will describe the results found after conducting the research. Chapter 5 will interpret the results and provide a personal reflection describing how the research impacted the researcher personally and professionally and any impact there may have been on subjects involved in the study (where applicable) – the impact on student learning. Upon completion of the thesis the student will formally present her/his research project to the college.

  • This course provides students with a broad understanding of American political foundations, processes, actors, and institutions. The semester is divided into three main sections. During weeks one through five, we will examine the country’s founding period, the structure of the Constitution, and constitutional guarantees and requirements. During weeks six through eleven, we will examine the roles of public opinion, the media, special interest groups, campaigns and elections, and parties within the political system. In weeks twelve through fifteen, we will cover the institutions of government, including Congress, the presidency, and the judiciary.

  • This course examines the major issues and debates regarding women and American politics. We will first examine the origin and development of women’s rights movements in the United States. We will move from the fight for women’s suffrage through second wave feminism and the backlash against it—and take a close look at the fight for the ERA. The second section explores women’s behavior as actors within the political system—as voters, candidates, and officeholders. In the final unit, we will examine laws and public policies related to women and employment and examine the recent litigation over gender discrimination at Wal-Mart.

  • Beginning with the Classical Daoist texts of the 3rd century BCE (often referred to as “philosophical Daoism”), we will discuss the mythical/mystical figure of Laozi  and the seminal and enigmatic text attributed to him (the Daodejing), the philosopher Zhuangzi, and other Daoist sages.  We will then examine the origins, beliefs, and practices of the Daoist religion, with its hereditary and monastic priesthoods, complex body of rituals, religious communities, and elaborate and esoteric regimens of meditation and alchemy

  • This course examines philosophical conceptions of curriculum, educational assessment, and principles of planning instruction. Students will construct assessment tools for the evaluation of student progress, teaching effectiveness, and curriculum alignment. Additionally, students will investigate state testing, interpretation, and the meaningful use of results.

  • This course will explore current and relevant educational issues that possess interconnections with politics, history, ideology, curriculum, and social practice. The primary focus of the course will be on examining the major opposing viewpoints on the issues in American schools of today. Through the integration of knowledge, the course prepares educators to critically examine various schools of philosophical thought and political issues related to education. Analyzing existing programs to improve school effectiveness, and review research-based best practices for effective educational outcomes will be addressed. While none of the topics will be covered in great depth, it is hoped that educators will be inspired to explore in depth topics of personal interest.

  • This course examines the major issues and debates regarding women and American politics. We will first examine the origin and development of women’s rights movements in the United States. We will move from the fight for women’s suffrage through second wave feminism and the backlash against it—and take a close look at the fight for the ERA. The second section explores women’s behavior as actors within the political system—as voters, candidates, and officeholders. In the final unit, we will examine laws and public policies related to women and employment and examine the recent litigation over gender discrimination at Wal-Mart.

  • This project-oriented, hands-on course will enable candidates to develop strategies for the effective integration of computer and multimedia technologies in their classrooms. Basic understanding and practical uses of major software applications and emerging computer and multimedia technologies will be emphasized. Use & modeling of Web 2.0 tools will be apparent. Candidates will develop various projects that utilize computer and multimedia technologies for curriculum enhancement, communication, record keeping, and assessment. Additionally, candidates will focus on the societal implications and ethical challenges facing educators in 21st Century classrooms.

  • This course provides in-service teachers with an understanding of the essentials of reading processes necessary for all students to become proficient readers. The course will teach the most promising elements of effective literacy programs based in research and/or professional opinion. Application of the elements to content area texts will help students derive greater comprehension of content area material.

  • In this course students will study the fundamentals of economic analysis by applying economic principles to macroeconomic problems, including inflation, employment, growth, business cycles, and governmental budgets. Emphasis will be placed on evaluating real world events using methods of economic analysis, with focus on theories, equations, and graphs as diagnostic tools, and on the role of fiscal policy and monetary policy in macroeconomic stabilization. Students successfully completing this course will have an understanding of basic economic principles focused on the market system, and will be able to think about world events from an economic perspective.

  • This course is a survey of traditional and contemporary concepts associated with computer technology. A two-pronged approach involves understanding the functioning of personal computers and how computer technology is applied in western society as well as the practical use of application software. This application software includes word processing, spreadsheet and database management tools.

  • Study of management from a general perspective. Major functional areas of internal and external activities of an organization, the decision-making process, and the place of the computer in contemporary management. Emphasis on formulation and implementation of policy in keeping with an organization’s goals.

  • Feminist Theory: Literary Analysis will primarily address how women enabled themselves to write literature throughout history, a particularly difficult task considering that they were often not considered to be subjects. The course asks and provides answers to the question: How were women able to write, an act of creation, when they were considered to be passive objects? Moreover, the class addresses how women used writing itself in order to gain a form of subjectivity.

  • The class will study Hindu creation myths, the Vedic deities, karma, samsara (reincarnation), liberation, the relation of atman to Brahman, divine descent, dharma, caste, the stages of life, and the role of women. We will examine this great tradition both historically and thematically.

  • This course entails the examination, application, and treatment of major principles of psychology, including: an introduction to scientific and research methods, biological foundations, sensation and perception, learning and conditioning, human development, motivation and emotion, thinking, memory and intelligence, personality theories, stress and coping, social psychology, psychological disorders.

  • This course is designed to give students a sense of the complexity and variety of the history of the United States, from contact to colonization to civil conflict, and to introduce them to the discipline of History and how historians think, research and interpret the past. A central theme of the course is the relationship between the ideas which have come to be associated with the history of this country—democracy, liberty, equality, the “American Dream,” America as a special country with a special destiny—and the ways in which these ideas have or have not been realized and with what consequences.

  • This is a writing-intensive introduction to the histories, conventions, methods, and pleasures of
    particular literary genres. The focus varies from year to year but could include poetry, drama,
    fiction, autobiography, popular literature, and combinations thereof. The course demonstrates
    the interdependency of writing, learning, and interpretation. Prerequisite: Foundations course.
    LIT, WI

  • This course is a comprehensive approach to support student achievement across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. SAS involves the understanding and integrated use of six areas including: PA and Common Core standards, fair assessment, curriculum framework, aligned instruction, materials and resources, and interventions. Course goals and content include: understanding the national movement for core academic standards, understanding Pennsylvania’s Standards Aligned System (SAS), understanding the research base underlying the 6 components (delineated above), use of diagnostics and formative assessment, use of PA’s Ed Portal as an ongoing job-embedded resource for educators, and Development and conduction of a professional development activity or awareness session in the educator’s own school district on PA’s SAS and curriculum frameworks.

  • This course introduces students to sociology as a social science.  Major topics include the nature of group structure and interaction, social control and deviance, culture, social change, social stratification and the structure and function of social institutions.

  • This course examines how firms assess, analyze, create, deliver, communicate and capture value. Consumer behavior, marketing research, pricing, product, and promotion strategy, distribution channels are covered topics. What are the changes occurring to the marketing field in a post industrial society? What is the role of marketing within the business and society as a whole? Social and ethical issues are analyzed.

  • This course introduces students to the settings, process, content, and effects of public policy making in the United States. The course will enable students to develop a better understanding of the impact of institutional and ideational arrangements on policy outcomes and a framework with which to analyze public policy in contemporary America. In the first section, we will take a close look at the study of public policy. In the second section, we will examine how policies are analyzed. We will utilize George W. Bush’s autobiography in order to provide a real-world lens through which to examine these initial topics. In the third section, we will look at particular issues and controversies in public policy, such as economic, health care, welfare, education, environmental, and foreign policy.

  • EDU 598 examines exemplary literature and research projects that represent examples of the systematic collection, evaluation, presentation, and interpretation of research data in education. Various research designs and methodologies are explored, emphasizing actions research done in educational contexts. Student research projects will reflect a specific education research style, such as experimental, correlational, survey, grounded theory, ethnography, narrative or mixed methods. Students will be guided in the selection of an appropriate master’s project topic and a review and critique of relevant literature. The students will develop a comprehensive design proposal for a major research project.
    EDU 598 is the first course of the master’s project. The final stage in the master’s project is EDU 599. Upon completion, the student will formally present her/his research project to the college.

  • Classical and contemporary theories of ethics and values, with applications to practical problems. Brief introduction to metaethics.

  • Students will read authors whose works have strongly influenced modernity: e.g., Wordsworth, Coleridge, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Kafka, Woolf, and Freud. Discussion topics include the romanticism-realism debate, the critique of patriarchy, and the emergence of the unconscious.

  • This is a writing-intensive introduction to the histories, conventions, methods, and pleasures of
    particular literary genres. The focus varies from year to year but could include poetry, drama,
    fiction, autobiography, popular literature, and combinations thereof. The course demonstrates
    the interdependency of writing, learning, and interpretation. Prerequisite: Foundations course.
    LIT, WI

  • The course will examine best practices in instructional and curricular practices and strategies and the characteristics evidenced in effective teaching studies. The course aims to help M.Ed. students to construct a useful bridge between theory and practice. Members of the course will apply their understanding of best practices of curriculum and instruction by completing assignments and projects that connect to their respective classrooms and areas of certification. Members will also apply their understanding of best practices and effective teaching throughout this course.

  • Students will examine the educational strategies and practices helpful in meeting the needs of students with special needs that are educated in the regular education classroom. The course will help teachers read and understand IEPs, Section 504 Plans/ PA Chapter 15 Plans, as well as PA Chapter 16 requirements and implement them in the inclusive settings. Co-teaching strategies with special education teachers in regular education classroom will be covered. The source will help teachers build relationships with and among students, teach social skills, and provide positive behavior supports.

  • Study of management from a general perspective. Major functional areas of internal and external activities of an organization, the decision-making process, and the place of the computer in contemporary management. Emphasis on formulation and implementation of policy in keeping with an organization’s goals.

  • Incorporates a biopsychosocial approach to understanding human wellness and health promoting and health compromising behaviors. Theories used by health psychologists will be used to explore topics including stress, chronic illness/disease, pain, and lifestyle behaviors and applied to the promotion and maintenance of health and the prevention and treatment of illness.

  • This course focuses on the leadership roles of professional nurses, including the impact of health policy, health care financing, and legislative and regulatory authority on nursing practice and the health care delivery system. Collaborative practice will be examined with emphasis on professional values, accountability, role transition, and collegiality.

  • This course will explore the principles and components of differentiated instruction through the study of current and promising practices, as well as relevant research to meet the needs of all learners. It will assist educators with identifying the diverse educational needs, strengths, learning styles and preferences of all learners as well as applying differentiation of instruction to meet those needs.

  • This course prepares students to deal with the conceptual, theoretical, political, and philosophical issues in multicultural education. It has been designed to clarify issues related to pluralistic education, adopt a philosophical position, design and implement effective teaching strategies that reflect ethnic and cultural diversity, and prepare sound guidelines for multicultural programs and practices. In this course, diversity refers to all ways in which people differ, including that of socio-economic status, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religious practices, and other differences.

  • EDU 599 is the capstone course for the Wilson M. Ed. program. Completion of a master’s thesis is the end product. The thesis project involves action research done in the student’s classroom or educational setting. The thesis will be completed in a chapter format. Chapter 1 will introduce the research project by describing the need for the study, a statement of the problem, and by identifying the research question. Chapter 2 will review the literature in the area specific to the research question. Chapter 3 will describe the methods used to conduct the action research. Chapter 4 will describe the results found after conducting the research. Chapter 5 will interpret the results and provide a personal reflection describing how the research impacted the researcher personally and professionally and any impact there may have been on subjects involved in the study (where applicable) – the impact on student learning. Upon completion of the thesis the student will formally present her/his research project to the college.

  • This course will explore current and relevant educational issues that possess interconnections with politics, history, ideology, curriculum, and social practice. The primary focus of the course will be on examining the major opposing viewpoints on the issues in American schools of today. Through the integration of knowledge, the course prepares educators to critically examine various schools of philosophical thought and political issues related to education. Analyzing existing programs to improve school effectiveness, and review research-based best practices for effective educational outcomes will be addressed. While none of the topics will be covered in great depth, it is hoped that educators will be inspired to explore in depth topics of personal interest.

  • Beginning with the Classical Daoist texts of the 3rd century BCE (often referred to as “philosophical Daoism”), we will discuss the mythical/mystical figure of Laozi  and the seminal and enigmatic text attributed to him (the Daodejing), the philosopher Zhuangzi, and other Daoist sages.  We will then examine the origins, beliefs, and practices of the Daoist religion, with its hereditary and monastic priesthoods, complex body of rituals, religious communities, and elaborate and esoteric regimens of meditation and alchemy

  • This course examines the major issues and debates regarding women and American politics. We will first examine the origin and development of women’s rights movements in the United States. We will move from the fight for women’s suffrage through second wave feminism and the backlash against it—and take a close look at the fight for the ERA. The second section explores women’s behavior as actors within the political system—as voters, candidates, and officeholders. In the final unit, we will examine laws and public policies related to women and employment and examine the recent litigation over gender discrimination at Wal-Mart.

  • This course is a survey of traditional and contemporary concepts associated with computer technology. A two-pronged approach involves understanding the functioning of personal computers and how computer technology is applied in western society as well as the practical use of application software. This application software includes word processing, spreadsheet and database management tools.

  • This course is an introduction to the development of an appreciation of art. Special emphasis is placed on methods, techniques, and terminology that relate to art as well as artists, cultures, and art movements throughout history.

  • This course introduces students to the settings, process, content, and effects of public policy making in the United States. The course will enable students to develop a better understanding of the impact of institutional and ideational arrangements on policy outcomes and a framework with which to analyze public policy in contemporary America. In the first section, we will take a close look at the study of public policy. In the second section, we will examine how policies are analyzed. We will utilize George W. Bush’s autobiography in order to provide a real-world lens through which to examine these initial topics. In the third section, we will look at particular issues and controversies in public policy, such as economic, health care, welfare, education, environmental, and foreign policy.
  • This course examines the major issues and debates regarding women and American politics. We will first examine the origin and development of women’s rights movements in the United States. We will move from the fight for women’s suffrage through second wave feminism and the backlash against it—and take a close look at the fight for the ERA. The second section explores women’s behavior as actors within the political system—as voters, candidates, and officeholders. In the final unit, we will examine laws and public policies related to women and employment and examine the recent litigation over gender discrimination at Wal-Mart.
  • This course provides students with a broad understanding of American political foundations, processes, actors, and institutions. The semester is divided into three main sections. During weeks one through five, we will examine the country’s founding period, the structure of the Constitution, and constitutional guarantees and requirements. During weeks six through eleven, we will examine the roles of public opinion, the media, special interest groups, campaigns and elections, and parties within the political system. In weeks twelve through fifteen, we will cover the institutions of government, including Congress, the presidency, and the judiciary.
  • This course provides students with a broad understanding of American political foundations, processes, actors, and institutions. The semester is divided into three main sections. During weeks one through five, we will examine the country’s founding period, the structure of the Constitution, and constitutional guarantees and requirements. During weeks six through eleven, we will examine the roles of public opinion, the media, special interest groups, campaigns and elections, and parties within the political system. In weeks twelve through fifteen, we will cover the institutions of government, including Congress, the presidency, and the judiciary.
  • Classical and contemporary theories of ethics and values, with applications to practical problems. Brief introduction to metaethics.
  • Students will read authors whose works have strongly influenced modernity: e.g., Wordsworth, Coleridge, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Kafka, Woolf, and Freud. Discussion topics include the romanticism-realism debate, the critique of patriarchy, and the emergence of the unconscious.
  • Students will read authors whose works have strongly influenced Western culture: e.g., Homer, Sappho, Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle, Dante, Boccaccio, and Voltaire. Discussion topics include the history of ideas, the construction/critique of a canonical tradition, and the self in society. FWC, LIT, WI
  • The development of American literature from the later 19th century through 1945. Emphasizes the intellectual, social and aesthetic concerns that have shaped American fiction, poetry and drama.
  • EDU 599 is the capstone course for the Wilson M. Ed. program. Completion of a master’s thesis is the end product. The thesis project involves action research done in the student’s classroom or educational setting. The thesis will be completed in a chapter format. Chapter 1 will introduce the research project by describing the need for the study, a statement of the problem, and by identifying the research question. Chapter 2 will review the literature in the area specific to the research question. Chapter 3 will describe the methods used to conduct the action research. Chapter 4 will describe the results found after conducting the research. Chapter 5 will interpret the results and provide a personal reflection describing how the research impacted the researcher personally and professionally and any impact there may have been on subjects involved in the study (where applicable) – the impact on student learning. Upon completion of the thesis the student will formally present her/his research project to the college.
  • EDU 598 examines exemplary literature and research projects that represent examples of the systematic collection, evaluation, presentation, and interpretation of research data in education. Various research designs and methodologies are explored, emphasizing actions research done
    in educational contexts. Student research projects will reflect a specific education research style, such as experimental, correlational, survey, grounded theory, ethnography, narrative or mixed methods. Students will be guided in the selection of an appropriate master’s project topic and a review and critique of relevant literature. The students will develop a comprehensive design proposal for a major research project.
    EDU 598 is the first course of the master’s project. The final stage in the master’s project is EDU 599. Upon completion, the student will formally present her/his research project to the college.

  • The course will examine best practices in instructional and curricular practices and strategies and the characteristics evidenced in effective teaching studies. The course aims to help M.Ed. students to construct a useful bridge between theory and practice. Members of the course will apply their understanding of best practices of curriculum and instruction by completing assignments and projects that connect to their respective classrooms and areas of certification. Members will also apply their understanding of best practices and effective teaching throughout this course.
  • Students will examine the educational strategies and practices helpful in meeting the needs of students with special needs that are educated in the regular education classroom. The course will help teachers read and understand IEPs, Section 504 Plans/ PA Chapter 15 Plans, as well as PA Chapter 16 requirements and implement them in the inclusive settings. Co-teaching strategies with special education teachers in regular education classroom will be covered. The source will help teachers build relationships with and among students, teach social skills, and provide positive behavior supports.
  • This course studies the best practices in elementary reading instruction to accommodate the needs of varied learners. Study will involve best practices related to literacy development and exploration of the implications of knowledge about the reading/writing process for effective instruction. Topics include: research knowledge about literacy processes, early literacy experiences, the five building blocks in reading instruction, instructional materials, classroom organization for effective literacy instruction, and strategies for instruction/assessment in reading. In addition, this course provides in-service secondary teachers with an understanding of the essentials of reading processes necessary for secondary students to become proficient readers. Participants gain an understanding of the following five areas: purposes and types of reading, methods of assessing reading, strategies, and skills in reading, student-centered reading instruction and affecting dimensions of reading.
  • This course will explore the principles and components of differentiated instruction through the study of current and promising practices, as well as relevant research to meet the needs of all learners. It will assist educators with identifying the diverse educational needs, strengths, learning styles and preferences of all learners as well as applying differentiation of instruction to meet those needs.
  • This course prepares students to deal with the conceptual, theoretical, political, and philosophical issues in multicultural education. It has been designed to clarify issues related to pluralistic education, adopt a philosophical position, design and implement effective teaching strategies that reflect ethnic and cultural diversity, and prepare sound guidelines for multicultural programs and practices. In this course, diversity refers to all ways in which people differ, including that of socio-economic status, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religious practices, and other differences.

  • Introduction to the major classes of biomolecules. Study of selected metabolic processes with a focus on enzyme controlled reactions. Topics include: protein structure and function, enzymatic mechanisms, kinetics and regulation, membrane structure and function, bioenergetics, glycolysis, citric acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. NS (Natural Science)